Alabama

Alabama does not have a state False Claims Act. However, those who witness fraud, waste or abuse affecting either the state or federal government can file a whistleblower lawsuit under the qui tam provisions of the federal False Claims Act. Whistleblower provisions in the False Claims Act also protect relators from workplace retaliation resulting from their report. Contact us to learn more about your rights as a whistleblower.

Alabama Whistleblower and Qui Tam News

  • Whistleblowers at VA hospitals unite to push reforms
    Jun 10, 2015 – Whistleblowers from Veterans Affairs medical facilities across the country, including are banding together to keep pressure on the VA to fix the agency, protect whistleblowers and improve veteran patient care.
    (wsfa.com)
  • Alabama Whistleblower’s Retaliation Lawsuit Can Move Forward, Appeals Court Rules
    October 12, 2014 – An Alabama whistleblower undergoing a protracted fight to get his job at Central Alabama Community College (CACC) back won his case this week in a federal appeals court.
    (rightinginjustice.com)
  • Alabama Whistleblower Still Coping With Backlash, Even After U.S. Supreme Court Victory
    August 1, 2014 – A whistleblower who called out corruption involving a state representative and Central Alabama Community College (CACC) won a landmark U.S. Supreme Court victory, but is still paying a “drastic” price in the aftermath of the ruling.
    (rightinginjustice.com)
  • Alabama Nurse Receives $15 Million Whistleblower Reward For Exposing Medicare Fraud
    June 2, 2014 – A Monroeville, Ala., nurse who filed a False Claims Act lawsuit against a home health care company will receive more than $15 million for her part in helping the U.S. recover $150 million in funds that she and others claim were fraudulently taken from Medicare and other health care programs. April Brown filed her whistleblower lawsuit in a federal court in Birmingham in 2010, alleging that her employer, Baton Rouge, Louisiana-based Amedisys Inc. billed for health care services that she hadn’t provided or were provided but not medically necessary.
    (rightinginjustice.com)