Texas

Texas does have a state False Claims Act; however, it only applies to cases involving Medicaid fraud. But, the U.S. Department of Health & Human Services rates Texas’s FCA at least as strong as the federal FCA when it comes to Medicaid fraud claims. If you have a whistleblower claim, please contact us so that a lawyer may advise you about your whistleblower rights under the state FCA as well as qui tam provisions of the federal False Claims Act.

To see the Texas False Claims Act statute, click here.

Texas Whistleblower and Qui Tam News

  • 3 Whistleblowers Share $6 Million Award In Case Against Texas Hospital
    May 14, 2015 – Three whistleblowers will share an award of nearly $6 million for their role in helping the federal government recover $21.75 million from a Texas hospital that allegedly profited by maintaining improper financial relationships that violated the Stark Statute and the False Claims Act. According to the U.S. Justice Department, the three whistleblowers, Dakshesh “Kumar” Parikh, Harish Chandna, and Ajay Gaalla sued Citizens Medical Center in Victoria, Texas, under the qui tam provisions of the False Claims Act.
    (rightinginjustice.com)
  • Texas SC rejects whistleblower’s suit against TCEQ
    November 25, 2014 – The Texas Supreme Court has rejected a whistleblower’s suit against a Texas environmental agency. Rosaena Resendez was fired from Texas Commission on Environmental Quality after she reported alleged wrongdoing to supervisors and to the office of a state senator. In a per curiam order release Nov. 21, the Supreme Court dismissed her case, stating that it did not satisfy the requirements under the Texas Whistleblower Act. The court stated that another recent case, Texas Department of Human Services v Okoli, it reaffirmed that an internal report of wrongdoing does not trigger the act’s protection unless it is made directly to an authority with “outward-looking law-enforcement power.”
    (setexasrecord.com)
  • Texas Guardrail Maker Loses Whistleblower Case, Jury Orders Company To Pay $175 Million
    October 22, 2014 – A Texas guardrail manufacturer accused by a whistleblower of defrauding the federal government has been ordered to pay $175 million by a federal jury.
    Dallas-based Trinity industries for years has manufactured guardrail systems for the Federal Highway Administration (FHA), which uses them on highways in most every state. In 2012, whistleblower Josh Harman, a Virginia guardrail installer and safety advocate, sued Trinity under the qui tam provisions of the False Claims Act, accusing the company of secretly changing the design of its government-approved ET-Plus guardrail system. According to Mr. Harman, the redesigned ET-Plus guardrails cost less for Trinity to produce but endanger motorists instead of protecting them.
    (rightinginjustice.com)
  • DOJ Settles $6 Million Suit With Help Of San Antonio Whistleblower
    October 1, 2014 – The U.S. Department of Justice with the help of a San Antonio whistleblower settled a 7 year-old court case over allegations that Caremark, a part of CVS Health, intentionally miscalculated the amount they repaid Medicaid for prescriptions for more than a decade. According to unsealed court documents, Donald Well found an error in the way his employer was calculating government reimbursements while auditing the company’s reimbursement program in 2004. Well was a claims manager for CaremarkPCS, a pharmacy benefit management company, also called a PBM. It would later become CaremarkRx, a subsidiary of CVS Health. Basically insurance companies, unions, and others pay PBMs to manage the prescription portion of health plans.
    (tpr.org)